McCullough Marketing has moved to RE/MAX of Nanaimo

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Oct
16
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As Halloween fast approaches in two weeks, I thought that it might be interesting to take a look at some of the spookiest properties in North America. I have heard creepy stories from clients who have lived in haunted homes. Their tales of having bed linens ripped from their bed while sleeping, to hearing laughter and voices have been enough to convince me that it would cause me a sleepless night or two if I had lived there. As a young man, I remember a friend of mine who owned a property on the outskirts of town in Dawson Creek. He had heard strange complaints from previous tenants about headless ghosts and blood appearing on walls, but he chalked it up to crazy tenants wanting to break a lease. He had a buddy who had multiple tattoos, rode a Harley, liked to fight, and was just an all-round "tough guy" who was looking for a place to stay. The tough guy picked up the keys and headed his new home to begin the next chapter of his life. LESS THAN 24 HOURS LATER, (it was actually 2AM), this hulking career criminal packed up his belongings and checked himself into a hotel for the night. The next day, he dropped the house keys off to his friend. He had been so terrorized by whatever he had witnessed in the house, that he said he had felt safer in prison. I always wonder what happened to that house and how many tenants have moved in-only to move out a short time later!
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Oct
08
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I read an interesting blog this week that looked at what special rooms are becoming popular again. Much like the real estate market itself, interior design and home styles are cyclical in nature. One such trend that is apparent to many home buyers in Nanaimo is the surge of new homes offering legal suites. For many, this allows buyers to afford a bigger or more executive-style home as the rental income offsets the cost of the mortgage. However, suites have been popular throughout the decades for other reasons as well. Years ago, the wealthier families would hire an "au pair" or nanny for the children and if you look at old real estate ads, you might have seen the wording that a home had an "au pair suite" which was a smaller apartment-like area that the nanny lived in usually with a bathroom and small kitchen area. For many cultures, the notion of an "in-law" suite was made popular as a means of caring for relatives as they aged. Today, many families are cohabitating to reduce living expenses and address the need for in-home childcare as both parents often work outside the home. According to Kermit Baker, chief economist for the American Institute of Architects, "many households want to ensure that their homes can support the needs of aging parents who may be staying for an extended period of time and other visitors with accessibility needs."
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Sep
25
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How much is a ghost town in BC worth? It can be as much as $7,000,000 dollars according to Krishnan Suthanthiran, who bought the town of Kitsault in 2005. Kitsault is a remote community in northwestern BC, approximately 230 kilometers from Kitimat and last occupied in 1983. Imagine for a moment...actually owning an entire town! The photo above is actually from the Kitsault Energy website and is quite beautiful and looks like any other small BC town. It is certainly not a purchase made by the faint of heart, or those without a long-term vision for development. Who is Mr. Suthanthiran and how did he end up the owner of Kitsault? Mr. Suthanthiran is the president of Kitsault Energy Ltd and his background spans the globe. Born in India and educated in Ottawa, he obtained a master's degree in engineering from Carleton University, and founded "Best Medical International", a distribution company servicing the health care industry throughout North America. He also made millions of dollars from previous real estate investments and saw the potential in this "blank canvas" of a town, Kitsault. To date, he has invested over $18 million dollars to maintain the infrastructures. He is hedging his bets that his energy company can secure multi-national contracts and bring growth and demand for housing to Kitsault.
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