McCullough Marketing has moved to RE/MAX of Nanaimo

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Oct
29
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A favorite story that I like to share with my friends is about the scorpion and the frog. One day, the frog and scorpion meet at the side of a bank. The scorpion asks the frog if he can give him a lift to the other side of the bank. Knowing that the frog is thinking that the scorpion wants to sting him, the scorpion assures the frog that he would not sting the frog as they would both drown and die. Convinced that the scorpion is telling the truth, the frog allows the scorpion to jump on its back and begins making its way across the water. About halfway, the scorpion stings the frog. The frog cannot believe what the scorpion has done and cries out to the scorpion "why have you stung me, now we will both drown?". The scorpion turns to the frog and tells him that "I am a scorpion and it is in my nature to sting you, I can't help it". They both drown in the water. End of story.
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Oct
22
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Did you know? The history of a pumpkin (often called a jack-o-lantern when carved during the Halloween season), dates back all the way to early Greece. In fact, the word "pumpkin" got its name from the Greek word "pepon" meaning large melon! The early pumpkins were not round and resembled a large turnip in shape. In fact, pumpkins and other squash types were often grown along riverbanks with beans and sunflowers long before corn was cultivated. A pumpkin is not considered a vegetable, but a fruit because of its seeds, although when it is cooked, it is often referred to as a vegetable! Pumpkins have a colorful history in North America and often were not just simply orange as we recognize today, but grew in many colors such as yellow, white or a reddish color. The First Nations used to roast strips of pumpkin for food during the long winter months and would also eat the pumpkin seeds or use them for medicine or ground them into a flour. One rumor that still exists today is that Christopher Columbus actually took pumpkin seeds with him back to Europe, although they simply used them as feed for the pigs. Early pilgrim settlers also quickly fell in love with the pumpkin and would cut the top off a pumpkin and hollow the inside out, and then fill it with cream, honey, eggs and spices and cook it in the ashes of a cooking fire. The pilgrims actually made a pumpkin beer which contained hops, maple sugar, pumpkin and persimmons. Today, pumpkin ale, pumpkin latte, pumpkin muffins and scones seem to be flooding the stores as soon as Fall approaches. The jack-o-lantern is believed to have originated in Ireland as they used to carve faces in turnips, potatoes and other root vegetables as part of a Gaelic festival. There are over 50 different types of pumpkins in the world, and some can grow several hundreds of pounds in size. With so many immigrants from Europe, carved turnips and potatoes quickly lost their popularity and were replaced by the easily grown and carved pumpkin.
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Oct
16
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As Halloween fast approaches in two weeks, I thought that it might be interesting to take a look at some of the spookiest properties in North America. I have heard creepy stories from clients who have lived in haunted homes. Their tales of having bed linens ripped from their bed while sleeping, to hearing laughter and voices have been enough to convince me that it would cause me a sleepless night or two if I had lived there. As a young man, I remember a friend of mine who owned a property on the outskirts of town in Dawson Creek. He had heard strange complaints from previous tenants about headless ghosts and blood appearing on walls, but he chalked it up to crazy tenants wanting to break a lease. He had a buddy who had multiple tattoos, rode a Harley, liked to fight, and was just an all-round "tough guy" who was looking for a place to stay. The tough guy picked up the keys and headed his new home to begin the next chapter of his life. LESS THAN 24 HOURS LATER, (it was actually 2AM), this hulking career criminal packed up his belongings and checked himself into a hotel for the night. The next day, he dropped the house keys off to his friend. He had been so terrorized by whatever he had witnessed in the house, that he said he had felt safer in prison. I always wonder what happened to that house and how many tenants have moved in-only to move out a short time later!
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